Collections Citations

Hochparterre on Frauen in der Architektur

Frauen waren lange nicht sichtbar in der Welt der Architektur. Zeit, dass sich das ändert! Ein prächtiger Bildband feiert nun die Arbeit von zeitgenössischen Architektinnen und wegweisenden Pionierinnen. Die Niederländerin Nathalie de Vries etwa ist mit ihrer an einen Bücherberg erinnernden Bibliothek (Spijkenisse, 2012) vertreten, die Dänin Lene Tranberg wird mit einem visionären Studentenwohnheim (Kopenhagen, […]

7 October, 2021

Emilie Appercé on I’m every woman

Book recommended by feminist philosopher Deborah Mühlebach during the reading room session organised by Annexe at ZAZ, Zentrum Architektur Zürich. In her first book, The origin of the world, which traces the cultural history of the vulva, as in I’m every woman, Liv Strömquist points out the absence of women in history in general, the lack […]

3 October, 2021

Emilie Appercé on Maintenance Art

This was recommended by Amy Perkins during the reading room session organised by Annexe at ZAZ, Zentrum Architektur Zürich. Free artist and full-time mother, when her daughter is born, Mierle Ukeles feels literally split in two. On the one hand, she is rediscovering the world through her daughter’s eyes, on the other, she is bored to death. […]

3 October, 2021

Emilie Appercé on Vom möblierten Zimmer bis zur Wohnung

Book recommended by the Association ProSaffa1958-Pavillon during the reading room session organised by Annexe at ZAZ, Zentrum Architektur Zürich. Berta Rahm wrote this handbook at the beginning of her career, a few years after she started her architectural practice in Zürich, which she eventually closed out in frustration with her profession to found her feminist publishing house […]

3 October, 2021

Amy Perkins on Speaking of Buildings

My interest in alternative sources for constructing architectural historiographies came about through multiple various conversations. Jane Hall spoke about how and why documents are preserved during the Parity Talks V in relation to her own experience with Lina Bo Bardi’s archive. Helen Thomas recommended that I look at Janina Gosseye’s research, which has since led […]

24 August, 2021

Amy Perkins on Ahmed for Architecture Students

  This fanzine, created by Brady Burroughs with master’s students attending her seminar in 2019, is part of a parallel series to the Routledge ‘Thinkers for Architects’ which follows the tradition of offering an easily digestible, predominantly male cannon of philosophers for architecture students. This short publication is a collective attempt at a new series […]

24 August, 2021

Amy Perkins on Architects Who Make a Fuss

Charlotte and Torsten ran the Parity Group on my arrival at the ETH with sharpness, clarity, drive, and an intoxicating quick wit. My first meeting in 2019 was energising – to hear a group of people discuss how to combat the homogeneity of the department in real terms, whilst listening to the concerns of each […]

24 August, 2021

Laura Evans on Purple Hibiscus

  Adichie’s rich and immersive descriptions of interiors, gardens, climate and the changing seasons serve to situate fictional events within a world so tangible that it is hard to leave it behind even when the book is finished. Her domestic settings in particular unfurl to reveal the hidden structures of class, religion and power that […]

24 August, 2021

Jaehee Shin on Building Role Models

Young female architects entering their 30s have conversations with senior female architects in order to broaden the narrative of female architects in Korean history. The authors describe the book as architectural stories requested by women and answered by women   This book is a compilation of the results of the forum ‘Building Role Models: Architecture […]

19 August, 2021

Jaehee Shin on the Sea of Jun Itami

Yoo Dong Ryong 유동룡 ( Jun Itami 이타미준 ) (1937-2011) is a Korean architect born and raised in Japan. The Sea of Jun Itami is a documentary about the life and philosophy of Itami Jun, a world-famous architect who worked in Japan while maintaining Korean nationality for his life. When we talk about his life, […]

18 August, 2021

Jaehee Shin on Dictee

  This is the first text that came to my mind when I saw this project. If we talk about Korean feminism, I think it is one of the most important texts. Since the text is in English, you can probably read it and understand the discourse a little bit in-depth. It is quite complicated […]

18 August, 2021

Jaehee Shin on Space of Sincerity

I would like to mention the architect 김현진 Kim Hyunjin. A few years ago, she published an architectural essay called The Space of Sincerity 진심의 공간, which is written in Korean. As an architect, she works on a small number of  works, and as a writer, she made her name  by publishing texts on her […]

18 August, 2021

Guilah Naslavsky on El interior de la historia: historiografía arquitectónica para uso de latinoamericanos

In the Portuguese translation: O interior da História: historiografia arquitetônica para uso de Latino-americanos (2013), which was first published in Spanish as El interior de la historia: historiografía arquitectónica para uso de latinoamericanos (1990), the architectural critic and historian Marina Waisman discusses the concept of regionalism as used in international criticism and understood as a positive […]

19 July, 2021

Yeshi Wang on Forms of Practice

I was very glad to discover this book on the contemporary history of Swiss architecture (1980-2000) a few years ago, which examines thoroughly the works that I’m familiar with and digs deeply into their historical and theoretical background. In the context of Women Writing Architecture, it is probably worth mentioning that the architectural scene at […]

14 July, 2021

Emilie Appercé on the New Woman’s Survival Catalog

I ordered my edition of the New Woman’s Survival  Catalog after watching a lecture by Mindy Seu, a designer and researcher whose work I discovered while scouring the colophon of a friend’s homepage as I was trying to build my own. The NWSC inspired her iconic cyberfeminism index—an online ever growing index which gathers techno-critical works starting from 1990 (when […]

4 July, 2021

Maria Conen on A Room of One’s Own

Virginia Woolf asks in her text about the reason, why women publish so little. One of her answers is that they usually do not have their own room. In this context, ‘one’s own room’ stands symbolically both in real spatial terms as a place of demarcation, but also in a figurative sense as a space […]

29 June, 2021

Murielle Morger and Eva Schneuwly on Caliban and the Witch

The story of Caliban and the Witch begins in times of upheaval. Society continues to evolve and starts to put the capital in the foreground. It seeks to increase efficiency. We can read this story from different viewpoints, but we decide to read ‘the “transition” from feudalism to capitalism from the viewpoint of women, the […]

28 June, 2021

Mariana Siracusa on The Lure of the Local

Up close and personal: This is how Marguerite Duras in ‘Écrire’, Lucy Luppard in ‘The Lure of the Local’, and Rosalind Krauss in ‘Passages in Modern Sculpture’ describe the ‘spaces’ and ‘places’ they write about. The stories they tell are always about personal experience, even private in Duras’ case, and this allows readers to picture […]

24 June, 2021

Mariana Siracusa on Passages in Modern Sculpture

Up close and personal: This is how Marguerite Duras in ‘Écrire’, Lucy Luppard in ‘The Lure of the Local’, and Rosalind Krauss in ‘Passages in Modern Sculpture’ describe the ‘spaces’ and ‘places’ they write about. The stories they tell are always about personal experience, even private in Duras’ case, and this allows readers to picture […]

24 June, 2021

Mariana Siracusa on Écrire

Up close and personal: This is how Marguerite Duras in ‘Écrire’, Lucy Luppard in ‘The Lure of the Local’, and Rosalind Krauss in ‘Passages in Modern Sculpture’ describe the ‘spaces’ and ‘places’ they write about. The stories they tell are always about personal experience, even private in Duras’ case, and this allows readers to picture […]

24 June, 2021

Linda Sjøqvist on The Mediated Plant

Humans see themselves as the centre of their environment, as the highest of the pyramid, the natural environment being there to sustain their race. Each time Western Europe discovers new aspects about living creatures, it directly infantilises them. With agriculture, humans started to fulfill their need for control over their environment to obtain more stability […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Scenes of Subjection

The fifth chapter of Scenes of Subjection, ‘Fashioning obligation: Indebted Servitude and the Fetters of Slavery’, offers reading to understanding the afterlife of slavery, not as legacy but through the mechanisms that operate today. As contemporary anti-racist feminist movements in colonized territories employ subversive interruptions to coloniality and work through decolonial praxis, it becomes imperative […]

24 June, 2021

WAI Think Tank on The Combahee River Collective Statement

A fundamental text to understand ‘identity politics’ that focuses on the black women’s oppression because ‘most profound and potentially most radical politics come directly out’ from the black women’s identity, something that in the case of black women is a ‘particularly repugnant, dangerous, threatening, and therefore revolutionary concept because it is obvious from looking at […]

24 June, 2021

WAI Think Tank on Encancaranublado y otros cuentos de naufragio

Ana Lydia Vega narrates through fictional short stories a post-colonial imagination of racialized, oppressed, and mythological subjectivity in the Caribbean. The importance of Encancaranublado to the architectural imaginary lies, among many things, in the capacity to render real and fictional phenomena to address the complex ideological, political, and cultural forces shaping life in the Caribbean, and thus, […]

24 June, 2021

WAI Think Tank on Black on Both Sides

C. Riley Snorton borrows the title from Yasiin Bey’s eponymous album to explore the central role that the racialization of the black subject plays in transness and transness plays in the construction of blackness. Rather than reading race as a secondary order of difference, which would presume that race is principally a biologized form (and […]

24 June, 2021

WAI Think Tank on Why Arguments Against Abolition Inevitably Fail

Angela Davis joined the online series Abolition for the People with an argument to dismantle the industrial carceral, and police system. Against the conservative stance of ‘reform’, Davis states that ‘racism is essentially systemic and structural rather than individual and attitudinal’ as repeatedly asserted by health care advocates and anti-police and anti-prison activists over many decades, […]

24 June, 2021

WAI Think Tank on Decolonization is not a Metaphor

Decolonization is not a Metaphor questions decolonization discourses without action, settler-moves to innocence, and problematizes how the ‘decolonial desires of white, non-white, immigrant, postcolonial, and oppressed people’, can be entangled in ‘resettlement, reoccupation, and re-inhabitation that further settler colonialism.’ As decolonization can only start by relinquishing the occupied land, the authors argue that the metaphorization […]

24 June, 2021

WAI Think Tank on Women, Race & Class

Angela Davis provides with Women, Race & Class a deep, intersectional critique of feminism, tracing black women’s struggle from slavery to birth control and reproductive rights, to their relationship to suffrage and emancipation movements. Davis’s take is fundamental to articulate a holistic reading of feminism outside of wealthy and white women’s voices, and it sets […]

24 June, 2021

WAI Think Tank on Black Metamorphosis

Exploring the process of indigenization of the tribal-African in the Americas, Sylvia Wynter provides a reading of the many ways that Yoruba, Ga, Ashanti, lbo, etc. were converted into a ‘homogenous commodity, into a unit of labour power collectively labelled’ and bound to the creation of the ‘plantation system.’ Wynter argues that it is in […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Unstitching Rex Trueform

Ilze Wolff surveys the biopolitics and white supremacist infrastructures and superstructures of a textile factory building during the years of apartheid in Cape Town. In the form of decolonial radiography, the book dissects and scrutinizes everything, from racist factory legislation to architectural features of racial and gender segregation, to machines that reinvented time through cyclical […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Ch’ixinakax utxiwa

Using the indigenous groups of the Andes region as the focal point, Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui proposes that indigenous ‘were and are, above all, contemporary beings and peers’ with their own commitment to modernity. Against what she calls the ‘cultural postmodernism, imposed by the elites and reproduced by the state in a fragmented and subordinate way’, […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on The Tertiary

Salas Rivera reexamines in this bilingual book theories of value in Marxist economics and suggests that just as labour is usually the ‘third thing that gives value’, there are also other tertiaries between ‘colonialism and Puerto Rico, queer and transness, the binary of colony and empire.’ Salas Rivera introduces The Tertiary

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Architecture of Counterrevolution

In opposition to article four of the French law of 2005 that states that colonialism in the North of Africa has a ‘positive role’ Samia Henni ‘dissects the effects of’ counterrevolutionary architecture in the ‘transforming of Algerian territory’ and exposes its intrinsic relationship with ‘military manoeuvres, political ideologies, and colonial doctrines.’ Leopold Lambert loudreads Architecture […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Farming While Black

Through biographical anecdotes and historical connections, Leah Penniman takes us through an imaginary tour of land reclamation, reparations that go from the settler-colonial occupation of the land, through models of feminist resistance like Combahee River Colony, to today’s strategies to relate to the land as black people. The editors of Deem Journal introduce Farming While Black […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Learning to Become an Extremophile

In Learning to Become an Extremophile, Ailo Ribas borrows a term coined by NASA to propose a form of existence based on the adaptation to extreme environments. In the face of constant and extreme threats, the (trans) extremophile redefines survival, learns to move across and between spaces, environments, and relationships.

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Bloodchild

Presented in a writing workshop for the production of a Post-Colonial publication, Octavia Butler’s Bloodchild explores a world post-earth where humans are domesticated and controlled by other species in order to carry their reproductive labor. Although Butler claimed that the story is about ‘love’, it impossible to overlook its parallels with colonization, white supremacy, and […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Parable of the Sower

Butler renders despair, selfishness, and decay in a world of exacerbated inequalities and asymmetrical accumulation of wealth. It is difficult to tell if this is climate apocalypse is somewhere in the future, or something many people have to live through now. Traumnovelle loudreads Parable of the Sower on the first session of Loudreaders, as the COVID […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Fronts

In the third session of Loudreaers Trade School, Ersela Kripa and Stephen Mueller presented their research on the urban simulations of military fronts on the border between the US and Mexico. Fronts: Military Urbanism & the Developing World dissects the potemkinesque simulation of racialized spaces and subjects while setting a dangerous blueprint for architectures of imperialist warfare, […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Queer Cartographies

Madrid-based collective VenidaDevenida introduces Paul B. Preciado’s text on subversive urban cartographies, the post-porn work of Annie Sprinke, and the need to distance from hegemonic and institutional readings of gayness through the eyes of white men in the seventh session of Loudreaders. Building on Preciado’s text, VenidaDevenia proposes architectural interventions that subvert heteronormative readings and […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on El Lector

In El Lector, Araceli Tinajero traces the Cuban beginnings and describes the evolution of the loudreaders and the role of iconic figures like the Puerto Rican feminist and anarcho-syndicalist Luisa Capetillo in the tobacco factories across the Caribbean and US as they were able to establish networks of subversive solidarity that promoted emancipatory practices. Among the […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on While They Sleep

A post-hurricane manifesto, Salas Rivera’s While They Sleep: Under the Bed is Another Country constructs a critique of necropolitics, necrocapitalism, coloniality, oppression, and other imaginaries. The main text in English addresses the US empire and its necropolitical implications on its colonial subjects, while the footnotes, in Spanish, propose answers as coming from its colony in Puerto Rico.

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Gore Capitalism

Sayak Valencia reads the border between Mexico and the US in Tijuana as a case study of the relationship between hyperviolence and law, militarization and the commodification of death, geopolitical borders, and the ‘post colonies,’ norm and exception, the state of war and states of security and freedom. Gore Capitalism is a critical gospel for […]

24 June, 2021

Loudreaders on Learning From the Virus

For Silvia Federici and Paul B. Preciado, the body is the centre around which capitalism, class, exploitation, and politics turn. Federici rethinks the origins and development of capitalism and a long history of models of resistance from a feminist viewpoint, while Preciado proposes to look at links between community and immunity, health and class, and […]

24 June, 2021

Helen Thomas on No more Frauenghetto, bitte

This provocative article written for the Neue Zürcher Zeitung, a serious high-quality Swiss newspaper for which Stahl was features section editor at the time, is a critical response to the exhibition ‘Frau Architekt’ held at the German Architecture Museum, Frankfurt. Stahl’s response won her the Michael Althen Prize for Criticism a year later, and provides an […]

15 June, 2021

Anne-Marie Armstrong on Grand Domestic Revolution

Dolores Hayden was my professor in graduate school, this book was read in one of her seminars that centered on gender in architectural and urban design. Her work provided me with a new and deeper understanding of the history of modern housing in America and the central role women played in its development.

15 June, 2021